Confessions of a Quackbuster

This blog deals with healthcare consumer protection, and is therefore about quackery, healthfraud, chiropractic, and other forms of so-Called "Alternative" Medicine (sCAM).

Thursday, November 11, 2004

Osteopathy and chiropractic - a little history....


In the United States, as in England, there were certain families who passed their bone-setting skills down as family trade secrets. The most famous bone-setting families were the Reece family (in west. Penn., and east. Ohio), the Sweet family (in Rhode Is., Mass., Conn., & NY), and the Tieszen and Orton families in South Dakota. The Sweets became orthopedists, the Tieszen and Orton families went into Chiropractic. The Irish Quain family were famous anatomists, surgeons, and physicians.

Osteopathy and chiropractic stemmed from the same occult philosophical roots, but went in different directions. Both shared the idea that the body has the ability to maintain good health if allowed to do so, and both emphasized the manipulation of bones and joints. Both were started about the same time period in America in about the same geographic area, by men who had Scottish ancestry.

A.T. Still (the founder of osteopathy) and D.D. Palmer both studied magic and metaphysics. Both attended many of the same spiritist meetings, for instance both attended the spiritualist meetings at Clinton, Iowa on a number of occasions. (Gibbons, 1980, p. 13)

The osteopath’s goal was to move bones to improve circulation. The chiropractor’s primary goal was to move bones to reduce pressure or the irritation of nerves, with the further goal of positively helping organs and tissue. A.T. Still & other osteopaths claimed Daniel D. Palmer visited Still at his house, but Palmer’s descendants say it’s not true.

Early on Still’s two best assistants were two doctors from Scotland, William Smith & James Littlejohn. Daniel David Palmer (1845-1913), founder of chiropractic, was a Freemason & an occultist. His original practice was to heal people with what he called "magnetic healing" which was a combination of laying on of hands, hypnotism and white magic. Of course it was not called white magic, it was called "magnetic healing" by Palmer.

Part of the magnetism was his own magnetic (hypnotic) personality. Palmer also knew phrenology and had a keen sense of touch concerning a person’s head. D.D. Palmer taught phrenology. D.D. Palmer was a mixture of good and bad traits. He was an excellent scholar and had good organizational skills for what he learned. One of his difficult traits was his megalomania. In 1905, at a coroner’s inquiry, Palmer refused to take an oath to swear the truth "so help me God", because he said that "I don’t want any help from God." It must have been hard on his pride, when his own son B.J. Palmer, who had been cruelly raised by cruel step-mothers, turned Judas and stole from his father both the honor & money that was due his father.

His son Bartlett Joshua Palmer (1882-1961) worked in a circus as an assistant to professional circus hypnotists known as Professor Hunt, and later Professor Herbert L. Flint. Later, with mysterious connections to the right people, B.J. Palmer, got the money and the political clout to get started in building a school for chiropractic. His powerful Davenport radio station, WOC, said to be the second largest in the U.S., had Ronald Reagan (our future president) as one of its sports announcers.

B.J. Palmer was connected to the occult world. He liked to encourage the idea that he was a Christ figure. New Ager Napoleon Hill, author of Think and Grow Rich (1937) considered Palmer his mentor. B.J. had prominent Masons and other elite as his personal guests. Elbert Hubbard, a friend of B.J.’s, was the person who persuaded John D. Rockefeller’s personal physician, to get Rockefeller to use chiropractic care. Later in 1963, Nelson Rockefeller would be the important person to get chiropractic accepted as legal in NY, and then appointed chiropractor Albert Cera to his Medical Advisory Committee.

Illuminati kingpin California Gov. Edmund Brown appointed 12 chiropractors to regional committees associated with the California Board of Medical Assurance. Hollywood got into the promotion of chiropractic, with the 1990 film Jacob’s Ladder which was a film exposing the U.S. military’s use of BZ (a derivative of LSD) in Vietnam to experimentally try to create aggression via drugs in American soldiers.

It appears that chiropractic occult ties have been beneficial in its fight for acceptance. The occult world has worked hard to keep chiropractic within its domain. This is why you will find Christians exposing the occult connections to chiropractic such as T.M. Clement’s book A Warning to Christians About the Origins of Chiropractic. (Moses Lake:WA, date of printing not known).

As the reader will discover other sciences involving the relationship of the mind, brain, the body and personality have also been kept in the domain of the secret societies. Like Palmer, Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, who founded osteopathy, was interested in phrenology, hypnotism, spiritism, magic. The reference book 10,000 Famous Freemasons (Vol. 4) outlines his Masonic career in Freemasonry. His writings include such Masonic phrases as "Great architect of the Universe." His grandfather had been Scotch-Irish. His father was a Methodist Episcopal minister, who was an abolitionist who fought with John Brown and the free-state forces in Kansas.

Andrew Taylor Still ran for the legislature of Kansas Territory as a free-state candidate and won in the Oct. 1857 elections. Later, he married Mary Elvira Turner, who was from the "burned-over" district in New York. She had been exposed to abolitionist ideas, phrenology, and hypnotism (called mesmerism) which were all popular in the area she grew. Her area of NY was where Spiritism began in 1848. Horace Greeley of the NY Tribune then made these seances with spirits famous. In 1867, after his children died, Andrew Taylor Still embraced spiritistism. Still’s beliefs in spiritism included ideas from Freemason Swendenborg’s writings. (For details of Andrew Taylor Still’s life refer to the book Trowbridge, Carol. Andrew Taylor Still. Kirksville, MO: The Thomas Jefferson Press, 1990.)

A.T. Still built osteopathy on the foundation of teachings of men such as phrenologist/hypnotists such as Joseph Rodes Buchanan. Buchanan used hypnosis and manipulation of the head to radiate the cerebral fluid from the brain to the body, which was coming close to the basics of cranial osteopathy. How did A.T. Still come up with these new ideas? A.T. Still was able to study and conduct experiments on bodies by raiding Indian graves for bodies, which he says in his "Circumstances and Personal Experiences" he did thousands of experiments on.

(there's more)

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